You NEED video, but don't just make one.

We get it! Videos are awesome (We love them!), and lots of people watch them. Well, good ones at least.

Don’t just make one because it’s what everyone is doing! If your competition all suddenly moved their headquarters, bought a fleet of cars, or built a flashy new website, would you do the same? Probably not, so why would you do that with video?

I can give you 10 reasons why you should have a video (and I will because I like you):

  1. Video Conversion rates outperform other marketing content.

  2. Video can create emotional connections that no other medium can.

  3. 52% of marketing professionals credit video with the highest ROI. (http://www2.invodo.com/l/12102/2014-02-25/l73kt)

  4. Video drives higher engagement through sharing, likes, embeds, and comments.

  5. 90% of online shoppers say video helped them make buying decisions. (http://www.videobrewery.com/blog/18-video-marketing-statistics)

  6. Video can increase email click-through rates.

  7. Video can improve your SEO (and increase your chance of a front page Google result by up to 53 times.)

  8. YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world. (http://www.mushroomnetworks.com/infographics/youtube---the-2nd-largest-search-engine-infographic)

  9. By 2017, 69% of all internet traffic will be video. (http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/ip-ngn-ip-next-generation-network/white_paper_c11-481360.html)

  10. 20% of users read the text while 80% will watch a video of the same content.

All facts, all interesting numbers, and all great for your business.

But none of that matters, if your video sucks. The problem is there are lots of companies and people out there with a great camera, great equipment, great skills, and they can probably do it on the cheap. Yet at the end of the day, what separates a professional company from an amateur one, is their ability to advise and craft a video that fits within your overall strategy. It’s just not good enough that it looks flashy anymore.

So where do you start?

1) Know your goals

We’ve written a whole blog on this here, but I can’t stress enough how important knowing your goals is. You are going to pay someone to make you something, so you want to make sure that crew can create what you need, for why you need it.

2) Have/Develop a plan

A good creative team should help you craft a plan. You are, after all, the client, and it’s your goals that need to be met. Pre-production is where everything comes together. The market research, the target audience, your current branding, brand voice, etc., etc., etc. All of that needs to be understood and incorporated by your creative team.

Professional video production isn’t cheap, but you should be investing in effective marketing the same way your would with a website, print materials, and so much more.

3) Hire the right crew

Sure, we’d love to be that crew, but we’re not right for everyone. As a company, you need to know the types of people you work well with, how much creative control you want them to have, and if you’re going to work well with them. We will be spending quite a lot of time together as we get to know your company and craft your story. Even on a small project, we might spend a day (total time) of planning, then a day filming, so we need to get along and communicate effectively to make a project great. So ask questions as if you’re hiring an employee, and if you’re not happy with the answers, then find someone else who you could work with.

4) Know your budget

We get asked a lot “Can you send me a quote?” Or “How much does a 3-minute video cost?” Those are really hard questions to answer because the scope can vary so much. We have a full breakdown here, but it really comes down to how much do you want to invest. A video project can costs anywhere from a few thousand, up to hundreds of thousands depending on what you want.

Knowing what you want to spend can save you and your production company a lot of time and energy. Being realistic about how much you want to spend can ensure the production team you approach, creates a proposal or idea within what you can afford. There’s nothing worse than getting really excited about a project, then learn it is going to cost $25,000 when you budgeted $5,000. Being honest upfront can ensure both sides can create what you need, for what you can afford.


In short, video production is a big endeavor. Projects can last for months and even years. Knowing your goals, having a clear plan, working with the right team, and communicating your budget can make sure you have a great video, that helps you realize some of those killer stats!


 

Braden Dragomir